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Why the desperation in this World of Warcraft can’t stop playing its most hated expansion

For better and for worse, Cataclysm is an expansion that has changed everything. And these people like it that way.
I never thought that it was necessary to have its own server of World of Warcraft: Cataclysm because in many ways Cataclysm is the reason players require a service like World of Warcraft: Classic in the first place. The Azerothians were constantly searching for this MMO when they learned of it during its barbaric early years in 2004. However, a quiet minority is eager to journey to the borders of Deepholm, Uldum, and the Twilight Plateau — the beginning of the modern era of Warcraft, rather than its mythical pre his history.

Why these World of Warcraft diehards can't stop playing its most hated expansion

I believe there are more people who prefer the Great Water.

Wilcalaf
Wilcalaf, 28, a Chilean, is the owner and owner of NRG-WoW, one of the few private Cataclysm servers to boast on the internet. His field does not revive the seedless, spotless kingdoms of retail vanilla, or the great imperfections of The Burning Crusade, or the windy Northrend expedition in the Wrath of the Lich King. Instead, he nurtured an Azeroth during the perpetual transition —those awkward Drozoo years, when Blizzard was trying to find the future for their ridiculously popular MMO. A time that most players are eager to forget. Wilcalaf talks about his work with a close sense of responsibility. For him, it’s personal.

Wilcalaf said in a private Discord conversation: “I believe there are more people who prefer Cataclysm and I’m trying to recreate that experience.” When I studied, I found that there was only one dedicated server dedicated to Cataclysm.”

If you’re one of the millions who played World of Warcraft in 2010, you can clearly understand why.

Combination
Let’s go back to the end of Wrath of the Lich King. Horde and Alliance have just overthrown the reign of the mighty Prince Arthas and returned home to Kalimdor and the Eastern Kingdoms eager to find a new bad guy to fill the power gap. Deathwing, a legendary obsidian-plated dragon last seen in Warcraft II, reacted dramatically by plunging through Azeroth’s crust and leaving a trail of chaos that lasted after waking up. The Barrens split in two, the Thousand Needles flooded, and a tornado could be destroyed in Darkshore.
These toys are image ally impressive — screenshots are perfect for selling Warcraft residents against a serious new threat — but functionally, Deathwing’s reign of terror has given Blizzard the correct justification for improving the vanilla leveling loop. By 2010, World of Warcraft was a standout game with a huge community of ordinary players, and the company needed to remove some decorative elements that had been included in the game’s original DNA. So Deathwing not only mastered geography, somehow, he also tried to leave better flight paths, defeat the elites and simplify missions after waking up.

The hydrolyses are a controversial expansion for a lot of other reasons. The level limit has been increased to 85 half-steps, the final raid is a brand-enhanced combination of existing content, and the plot is confused at best and most notably at worst. But for the most part, when people consider Cataclysm’s shortcomings, they will fix how the old world — the World of Warcraft they grew up playing — was permanently removed from the map. Now your only hope is to find those memories that already exist on secret vanilla private servers or World of Warcraft: Classic reset the upcoming universe.

So that’s what makes Wilcalaf’s devotion to the expansion so exciting for me, a proud World of Warcraft elite who has not counted time in a serious raid since Outland. I was mistaken to blame my heavy slide for the vague dissatisfaction with Blizzard’s game design spirit and I am fully aware of that making me the worst kind of WoW fan. Obviously, I know that Cataclysm is now almost 10 years old and a decade is enough time to nurture the feeling of indication for any cultural artifacts, but I still can hardly imagine that expansion exists in the pink era itself.

Then again, Wilcalaf told me that he had also played from vanilla, and although he loved those early days, there was nothing he felt the need to watch again. Instead, Cataclysm was his golden age, and his reasons for that sound blasphemous if you were a certain breed of hound.

when you’re not in that negative cloud. “The atmosphere is definitely a lot better on private servers because the players there usually really enjoy expansion,” he said. “So not many people lamented how much better Warcraft was before Cataclysm and all that.”

Then again, Wilcalaf told me that he had also played from vanilla, and although he loved those early days, there was nothing he felt the need to watch again. Instead, Cataclysm was his golden age, and his reasons for that sound blasphemous if you were a certain breed of hound.

Wilcalaf, of course, shares that lineage, but he still sees LFR as something that has completely changed his life for the better. After years of struggling with the harsh demands of the high-end Warcraft raid, he was suddenly free. “[It] made me unconscious stop raiding,” he said. “The moment I finished Dragon Soul on LFR, like my progressive needs through other troubled content was significantly lower.” , it’s hard to hate it.

The eyes of the love man
Cataclysm in my words is one of the best PvP extensions when it comes to class balance and viability.

Waroz
That’s what you learn when you spend some time with Cataclysm loyal. Everything you think you understand about World of Warcraft — its legacy, its shadow, its future —is all a matter of personal perspective. Cataclysm’s largest private server is called Hades, and on average it has a population of about 500 to 1,000 players. Warez, 21, from Finland, is one of them. He found his way back to the expansion after being turned off by a 2012 follow-up, Mists of Pandaria. Like Wilcalaf, the specifics of his obsession are very detailed. In this case, it was The PvP – he explained to me that the ability and the talent tree intertwined in an astonishingly powerful way convinced him to stay away from the raids and dungeons he once enjoyed. “In my view, Cataclysm is one of the best PvP expansions when it comes to class balance and viability,” he said.

The way Waroz describes it, Hades sounds like a paradise. A small village of devoted souls who all love expansion beyond this cycle. I played a lot of Cataclysms when it was life, and I remember walking through upset forums and malicious trafficking chats, all of which accused Blizzard of its deadly mistakes. After years of demolition and other murderers, this is finally the end of World of Warcraft. They were wrong because they were always wrong, but I was curious to know what the great storm would be like when you were not under that negative cloud. “The atmosphere is definitely a lot better on private servers because the players there usually really enjoy expansion,” he said. “So not many people lamented how much better Warcraft was before Cataclysm and all that.”

World of Warcraft is too big and too difficult to use to be a thing. It’s something that people (such as me) often ignore. Not everyone starts playing this game with vanilla. Some culminate then, some find the second breeze, and some find liberation, rather than moody, in Blizzard times towards more ordinary audiences. So when the company finally delivers World of Warcraft: Classic, we should remember that their promises apply only to a certain group of players. After 14 years, this MMO was no longer capable of having a classical period —Azeroth was a nation, and national history was often more complex and nuanced than a simple head, middle, and end. Someone’s Ragnarok is someone’s Deathwing, and Vashj’ir has never been as bad as we imagined.

“I definitely think people can be nostalgic about any era of WoW,” Waroz said. Everyone loves different expansions, and that’s okay! After all, it was nostalgia that put me in my first Cataclysm server and I’ve never looked back since.”

Private servers can provide a great experience, but they can be piracy and against the EULA of World of Warcraft. While we think this story provides an insight into the culture and history of World of Warcraft, PC Gamer does not advocate any copyright or piracy.

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