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Razer Asrock B550 TAICHI review

What does B stand for? Business? Budget? Boomshakalaka? Beauty? yes, that.

Since the launch of ASRock’s Taichi brand, we have admired its quality mix of price, performance, and features. It’s also one of the few sub-brands that doesn’t focus on the ‘game’ theme, which is something that many people appreciate. I know I do. With Razer’s influence, however, that has changed somewhat here. The traditional aesthetics of yin/yang machinery and serrated were eliminated with the release of the B550 Taichi Razer Edition.

This re-created TAICHI ASRock panel has an unmistakable minimalist yet premium look, integrating Razer Chroma RGB support. This is definitely a lovely looking table and if you’ve invested in the Razer ecosystem, then it’s a table that you’ll definitely want to consider to build the Ryzen 5000 series.

ASROCK B550 TAICHI RAZER EDITION REVIEW

Depending on the country you live in, for $299 USD, the B550 Taichi Razer Edition may be the most expensive B550 board of all, it is undoubtedly one of the best B550 motherboards. This is not a bargain cheap item in the budget box. It’s a full-features premium board with almost all the bells and whistles you’d expect from a passionate motherboard. Do you want to run over-over-pressed 5950X with 64GB of RAM? Pair it with Nvidia RTX 3090 or AMD 6900XT? Keep going.

As the name suggests, the table’s biggest marketing point is supporting the Razer Chroma RGB ecosystem. On the surface, it’s just another taste of RGB, but Razer doesn’t go beyond the usual implementation to include more effects while providing extensive customization with the Chroma Studio app. There is also game integration, support for many external applications, and Amazon Alexa integration. So if you want your RGB RGB, most likely Chroma can do it.

It actually looks very lovely, although as usual, a graphics card will cover a large part of the PCH heat dissipation. However, with all the other RGB devices that you can add to such a system, that’s not really a problem.

Other notable differences are the killer E3100 2.5G and AX1650 WiFi with DoubleShot support. The gaming community tends to love/hate a bit with Killer. A lot of them go back to the Cym number one Manager app. The days of LAN gaming are behind us, but it will be a great environment to experiment with. Throw everything in and you’ll be really stressed out with your network! The network outside your PC and home today is the real congestion point. During our testing, the Killer network functioned exactly as usual.

The table is dominated by large delicate black radiators with stylish RGB lights. RGB and ARGB fan plugs can be seen just above the RAM slot, which themselves support up to 128GB in DDR4-4733. While that speed may sound good, it’s a good idea to actually use a 1:1 ratio with Infinity Fabric up to about DDR4-4000.

The main M.2 slot is covered with its own radiator. Thankfully, this means that you are not required to remove the entire radiator to connect the drive. Perhaps the problem of world critic first? You also get eight SATA ports, something that is increasingly rarer today even on high-end boards as name and M.2 switches accelerate. The file hoarder takes note.

It is also worth noting that the inclusion of a USB Type-C box title. At the bottom of the table, you’ll find another set or RGB title and power and reset buttons. This is becoming more and more common in many cases.

VRM used on ASRock Taichi Razer Edition is one of the best you’ll find on the B550 board. Setting up 16 phases with 50a MOSFETs will easily power the over-pressured 5950X. The double EPS 8pin connector provides the juice.

I/O is quite typical of a high-end tablet. We like that there are eight USB ports on the back, although strangely they are not color-coded. There are two labeled USB 3.2 Gen 2 ports, four Gen 1 ports, and a pair of 2.0 ports. (Note: We really hope the USB naming error is fixed with USB 4. That’s actually BS.) We are not satisfied to see HDMI 2.1 and DP 1.4a ports. If you’re a gamer with a removable card then that doesn’t matter, but an APU based on Zen 3 with a thrombolytic mold can surprise you with its performance, so it’s better to have them.

As we often say when examining the motherboards, the performance between them usually lies in the error range or a few percent and that is the case again here. The B550 Taichi Razer Edition proved to be quite powerful in most multi-stream tests with our AMD Ryzen 9 5950X, which often leads the other X570 and B550 tables we have tested so far. However, the circuit board is somewhat more average in gaming tests.

As the name suggests, the table’s biggest marketing point is supporting the Razer Chroma RGB ecosystem. On the surface, it’s just another taste of RGB, but Razer doesn’t go beyond the usual implementation to include more effects while providing extensive customization with the Chroma Studio app. There is also game integration, support for many external applications, and Amazon Alexa integration. So if you want your RGB RGB, most likely Chroma can do it.

It actually looks very lovely, although as usual, a graphics card will cover a large part of the PCH heat dissipation. However, with all the other RGB devices that you can add to such a system, that’s not really a problem.

Other notable differences are the killer E3100 2.5G and AX1650 WiFi with DoubleShot support. The gaming community tends to love/hate a bit with Killer. A lot of them go back to the Cym number one Manager app. The days of LAN gaming are behind us, but it will be a great environment to experiment with. Throw everything in and you’ll be really stressed out with your network! The network outside your PC and home today is the real congestion point. During our testing, the Killer network functioned exactly as usual.

The table is dominated by large delicate black radiators with stylish RGB lights. RGB and ARGB fan plugs can be seen just above the RAM slot, which themselves support up to 128GB in DDR4-4733. While that speed may sound good, it’s a good idea to actually use a 1:1 ratio with Infinity Fabric up to about DDR4-4000.

The main M.2 slot is covered with its own radiator. Thankfully, this means that you are not required to remove the entire radiator to connect the drive. Perhaps the problem of world critic first? You also get eight SATA ports, something that is increasingly rarer today even on high-end boards as name and M.2 switches accelerate. The file hoarder takes note.

It is also worth noting that the inclusion of a USB Type-C box title. At the bottom of the table, you’ll find another set or RGB title and power and reset buttons. This is becoming more and more common in many cases.

VRM used on ASRock Taichi Razer Edition is one of the best you’ll find on the B550 board. Setting up 16 phases with 50a MOSFETs will easily power the over-pressured 5950X. The double EPS 8pin connector provides the juice.

I/O is quite typical of a high-end tablet. We like that there are eight USB ports on the back, although strangely they are not color-coded. There are two labeled USB 3.2 Gen 2 ports, four Gen 1 ports, and a pair of 2.0 ports. (Note: We really hope the USB naming error is fixed with USB 4. That’s actually BS.) We are not satisfied to see HDMI 2.1 and DP 1.4a ports. If you’re a gamer with a removable card then that doesn’t matter, but an APU based on Zen 3 with a thrombolytic mold can surprise you with its performance, so it’s better to have them.

As we often say when examining the motherboards, the performance between them usually lies in the error range or a few percent and that is the case again here. The B550 Taichi Razer Edition proved to be quite powerful in most multi-stream tests with our AMD Ryzen 9 5950X, which often leads the other X570 and B550 tables we have tested so far. However, the circuit board is somewhat more average in gaming tests.

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